open hardware

Open source tools allow Project Tango to evolve with speed and agility

open source tools for Project Tango

Google's Project Tango is a platform for Android phones and tablets designed to track the full 3-dimensional motion of the device as you hold it, while simultaneously creating a map of the environment around it. The devices track themselves with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and collect 3D points with a built-in depth-sensing camera. Project Tango is progressing at a fast pace thanks to many open source tools that facilitate the use of the 3D data. 

Only 200 of these devices have been made available to early testers and developers, and we had the luck of getting two of them at Kitware.

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The maker movement helps transform our public libraries

public library transformation with open source

The small town of Bethlehem, New York purchased a 3D printer and started teaching classes at its public library recently—jumpstarting the community's knowledge of advanced manufacturing and building upon a new way of doing things in a world where physical bookstores are dissappearing.

It's true. Public libraries are reinventing themselves. Today they are becoming less of a place that hosts physical books and more of a center where people collaborate, commune, and learn new things. » Read more

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University course teaches computer-human interaction with open hardware and OSS

open hardware class

Most people think of their interactions with computer systems to occur via a keyboard, mouse, or touchscreen. However, humans evolved to interact with thier environment and each other in much more intricate ways. Bridging the gap between the computational systems of the digital world and the natural world is being studied and tested in the Physical Computing course at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany.

As a professor of the course, we are currently leveraging a variety of open source software and hardware projects to learn about fundamental core concepts with hands-on experiences and implementation of open source tools. On the software side, we use an open-source IDE (Arduino Sketch) and develop 3D printer designs using OpenSCAD. On the open source hardware portion of the course, we utilize the Arduinos and the PrintrBot Simple. » Read more

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Arduinos, 3D printing, and more at Red Hat open hardware day

Opensource.com 3D printed coin

The Opensource.com team gathered in one of the large conference rooms at Red Hat tower in Raleigh on March 21 to make an open hardware day of it. » Read more

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Open source hardware takes flight

Flying with open source

This past Friday, we celebrated our Open Hardware Week here at Opensource.com with a staff open hardware workshop. Among the many fun things ranging from 3D printing to tinkering with Arduino boards and related electronics, I brought in a tiny remote control quadcopter which got back in December. It isn’t open hardware per se, but I figured buying a cheaper version would be a good option for me before I made the commitment to invest in pricier hardware for a DIY approach. The verdict? Totally fun! We had some nice minorly-destructive crashes inside Red Hat Tower before calling it a day. » Read more

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Book of fun and easy electronics projects

Arduino open electronics

"When you go to a store and buy an electronic gizmo, does it ever occur to you that you could make one yourself? Or even that it would be FUN to make one yourself?" This is how John Baichtal's Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs begins, and that same curiosity and ingenuity flows through the entire book.

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Six open electronics littleBits community projects

open electronics littleBits

littleBits makes electronic modules that snap together with magnets—no soldering, wiring or programming required. We believe in the power of open innovation—our designs are publicly available so that anyone can see and use them, and we foster a community of contributors who experiment, share online and learn from each other’s creativity.

Our growing community consists of engineers, designers, artists, educators, makers, hackers, kids and parents—the list goes on! » Read more

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Small group of makers transforms a big idea into a community of users

belief

Belief in a more collaborative process. Perseverence to make things better. Shared knowledge and access for all. These are the things that come to mind when I think about the work the e-NABLE community is doing.

Though they're on a trajectory without a clear future, their vision is crystal. To share what they've created with the world and allow the natural course of innovation and invention to change lives—without the obstacles of patents and the barriers of cost. » Read more

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Testing and tinkering with the Arduino Starter Pack

Arduino

Are you new to Arduino? Open hardware like the Arduino Starter Pack from Adafruit is a great way to start tinkering with this small computer board. It is the ideal kit for beginners to open hardware or anyone looking to start a project using the Arduino microcontroller.

To start, you need a computer from which you will write the code that will run in the Arduino board. This starter pack comes with an Arduino Uno board, which is likely the simplest. The typical programming cycle is to first write your code on the computer, then upload it to the Arduino board via a standard USB cable. The Arduino softwareis available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. » Read more

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