POSSE

Work on a free software project for a humanitarian cause

Professors in Open Source Software Experience - POSSE

What is Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software (HFOSS) in education and how can we get more students involved? HFOSS is open source software that has a humanitarian purpose such as disaster management, health care, economic development, social services, and more. Experience with undergraduate participation in HFOSS shows it can both motivate students and provide excellent learning opportunities. There is also an indication that it can help attract and retain female students. » Read more

2 Comments

A guide to teaching FOSS: teachers as learners

teachers as learners

Knowing everything about any open source project is impossible. If you're going to deal with a large community, you're not going to know all the details. This is unlike teaching courses where everything is black-and-white, and there are plenty of reference texts. If you're going to teach open source, you're going to have to change the way you teach. Rather than a lecturer, you're a mentor.

» Read more

5 Comments

How to get a class involved with an open source project

open source projects in the classrom

We talk about "community" a lot when it comes to open source, but it's important to remember that just like local communities within a city, town, state, and country, each community has its own culture. One community is not just like another. Each has its own ways of communication and tracking and decision-making. Processes for code submission differ—perhaps two communities both use Bugzilla, but with different flags. Others require you to also alert a mailing list. A large software project may even have smaller sub-communities within it with their own customs and quirks.

» Read more

4 Comments

Getting started with HFOSS in the classroom

Stoney Jackson teaching POSSE

If we look at the big picture view, most frequently people think of student contribution as code. But student learning can span HFOSS (Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software) as an item to be studied. You can draw artifacts from HFOSS and not contribute back, although that's not the preferred model. Contributing back starts the cycle of students being involved in a community. You can start as small as one assignment.

» Read more

0 Comments

Open source software experience for educators

posse 2013 educators in open source

The Professors' Open Source Software Experience (POSSE) workshop is being held this year in Philadelphia from June 2-4. To prepare for the workshop, online activites are were assigned to be completed in stages and culminated on June 1.

» Read more

0 Comments

Open Faculty Expertise grant helps teachers gain necessary expertise

teacher learner

A group of colleagues—Stoney Jackson (Western New England University), Sean Goggins (Drexel University), Darci Burdge (Nassau Community College), Lori Postner (Nassau Community College), and Greg Hislop (Drexel University)—and I have recently been awarded an NSF TUES Type 2 grant we’re calling OpenFE for Open Faculty Expertise. The expertise that we’re trying to build here is in the area of supporting student learning via participation in humanitarian FOSS (HFOSS) projects.

» Read more

0 Comments

POSSE 2012: Where true open source project problems and solutions arise

posse

POSSE (Professors Open Source Summer Experience) is a week long introduction to the FOSS community and its tools, development and instruction that has been offered and sponsored by Red Hat since 2009. Over 70 participants (mostly faculty, but with a few staff and grad students at some iterations) have attended sessions in the U.S., Qatar, South Africa and Singapore. » Read more

0 Comments

Six misconceptions about open source software

Fill in: True of False

In information technology (IT) and software development fields, there are a few fairly common misconceptions about the use of open source software. These misconceptions were debunked in a discussion at POSSE RIT 2012, and we’d like to share (and spread) that conversation. » Read more

5 Comments

Open source and faculty motivation

Open source and faculty motivation

When I spent some time going around North Carolina recently visiting POSSE professors, I had a realization: We encourage professors to be productively lost, to go out and feel immersed in a community, admit that they can't solve all of the problems themselves, and act more as a facilitator in the classroom. That helps them identify the right questions to ask--and the right places to ask them--online.
» Read more

0 Comments

FOSS meets IT Education at ACM-SIGITE

FOSS meets IT Education at ACM-SIGITE

The Association of Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group in IT Education (ACM-SIGITE) met at West Point's Thayer Hotel on the first day of the three-day conference--and free and open source software (FOSS) was one of the top items on the menu.

The conference offered a three-paper session and a panel on using FOSS in the classroom that were well attended and generated good questions (and answers) about approaches, tools, and techniques for bringing students into FOSS. » Read more

1 Comment