Spaghetti Open Data: a little thing that feels right | Opensource.com

Spaghetti Open Data: a little thing that feels right

Posted 04 Nov 2010 by 

Alberto Cottica (Red Hat)
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A few weeks ago, after a happy hour in Rome, people started spontaneously to share links on Italian open data and tools to crunch them with. With a few others, I thought it would be nice to collect these links in one place, a sort of one stop shop for people interested in transparency not just in theory, but in the practice of extracting information from public data. One thing led to another, and today Spaghetti Open Data is born. We aggregated 32 databases; not bad when you consider that data.gov, with all the firepower of the Obama administration, had 47 at launch.

It’s only a small thing, but it feels right for various reasons.

  • Firstly, it is a concrete achievement. I have had enough of complaining about the idle government, the backwardness of Italian culture, the financial crisis, bad luck. I have precious little time to spare, and I would like to invest it on projects that pay me back by yielding some kind of result. The Spaghetti Open Data group has put in some work, and in a few weeks it produced something which is actually there, and it works. If you want to build something with Italian open data you can, right now, without having to wait for structural change or a new generation in government. All it took is some voluntary work and 41 euro for hosting.
  • Secondly, it is intellectually rigorous. We had to ask ourselves the same questions that I imagine confronted the people in charge of data.gov and data.gov.uk. Are statistic data open data? (Apparently not) Does it make sense for statistical and open data to be collected in the same place? (Apparently it does, so that citizens can correlate the ones with the others) How to organize metadata? (We went for compatibility with CKAN, as in data.gov.uk) we have mapped a possible way for Italian open data, and future legitimate websites of open data have an all-Italian benchmark that they can consider, or even copy.
  • Finally, it is the expression of a small community of about fifty bloggers and civil servants that worked together towards a common goal, across their considerable cultural differences, showing mutual respect along the way. I have also had enough of bashing bureaucrats as stupid or evil. Some are just that, others are wonderful people and great war buddies. Most are reasonably clever, well-meaning people who happen to be very different from me: collaborating requires investing a little time and effort to come to understand each other. It is almost always worth it.

In the future, I only want to do this sort of thing. I’m done with declarations, petitions and talk. Simply doing is too much fun, even for a daydreamer like me. :-)

This article originally posted at cottica.net.

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As an economist, I set myself the goal of contributing to building an economy propelled chiefly by human intelligence – creativity, innovation, culture – rather than physical resources or the exploitation of man over man and nature. I am convinced that this model can emerge from the “perfect storm” under way in the digital economy, and that the creative industries are a good place to watch it from and, just maybe, to help it unfold. I have chosen to represent the general interest rather than