science - Page number 2

Creative Commons license liberates knowledge of ESIP community

lightning talk

Erin Robinson, the Information and Virtual Community Director for the Foundation for Earth Science, the management arm of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (@ESIPFed), says that earth science matters to all of us. For example, when Hurrican Sandy devastated areas of the country, responders needed information on flood zones and what hospitals were available.

ESIP is a cross-cutting community of application developers,
researchers, and big data centers comprised of about 1000 technology practitioners working together on common issues around earth science data and information. In order to support member contributions and collaborative work, ESIP built a non-traditional publishing platform, the ESIP Commons, which organizes member-produced content. Beyond structured input, the ESIP Commons also provides the option to license under Creative Commons and a suggested citation allowing community recognition and easy material reuse. Recently, the Data Citation Guidelines for Data Providers and Archives were picked up and resued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF)—a huge success.

The Drupal installation profile for the ESIP Commons will be available on Github in the coming weeks. And if you are interested in repurposing the Commons for your own group, please contact Erin at erinrobinson@esipfed.org.

» Read more

0 Comments

Event report: FOSDEM introduces science-focused devroom

on the scene

FOSDEM, held annually in Brussels, Belgium, is a free event for open source communities to meet, share ideas, and collaborate. It offers a mix of focused devrooms and themed main track talks, with no requirement for registration. It has a reputation of being highly developer-focused, this year brought together over 5,000 geeks from around the world.

» Read more

0 Comments

A time for action: One student's commitment to free and open access

good bad ugly

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves.—Aaron Swartz

I have been a PhD student for less than two years. On the other hand, for six years, I have been a member of the free culture movement, which emphasizes the importance of access to and openness of technology and information. » Read more

6 Comments

Values of science at odds with desire to turn it into a commercial product

creativity

Scientific software tools have long lived in the conflict zone between open source ideals and proprietary exploitation. The values of science (openness, transparency, and free exchange) are at odds with the desires of individuals and organizations to transition scientific tools to a commercial product. This has been a problem in neuropsychology and neuroscience for decades, and extends outside the bounds of software.

» Read more

1 Comment

Progress of science thanks to software being open source

mMass software code

Over the last months, I became more and more aware of the "open" movement. "Open" as in open access, open source, open data, open science. » Read more

4 Comments

How open source is outliving the hype 13 years later

open source in the stars

Open source as a buzzword has lost much of its buzz. It’s not quite as dead as "SOA," but it’s definitely been supplanted by today’s favorites: the Cloud, Mobile, and Big Data. Open source's demise as a hype label was inevitable—it’s hard to fake giving away your software for free (although there were more than a few companies over the years that were called out for being "faux-open source" with their freemium models or commercial licenses to the code). 
Thankfully, "open source" has outlived the hype to provide real value to the industry and to customers.

» Read more

3 Comments

A scientist calls for open access to research publications

Publishing the open source way

As a child I remember being fascinated by science, and developed an overwhelming urge to learn how everything worked. I loved science fiction, seeing authors explore the very edges of possible futures, extrapolating out the possibly feasible to its very limits. As I grew older and began a degree in Physics, I became even more certain I wanted to be a scientist and had a vision of what real science was all about. I remember the first few months of my PhD work being quite disappointing, learning that papers often lacked the necessary details to reproduce key reactions, or that I didn’t have access to certain papers due to their age or the journal they had been published in.

» Read more

4 Comments

Michelle Obama annouces new NSF undertakings to improve work-life balance and STEM careers for women

This afternoon, First Lady Michelle Obama spoke at a White House event about the importance of supporting and retaining women and girls in STEM careers. 

“If we’re going to out-innovate and out-educate the rest of the world, we’ve got to open doors for everyone,” said Obama.  “We need all hands on deck, and that means clearing hurdles for women and girls as they navigate careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).” » Read more

0 Comments

sprout: Reclaiming science as a creative craft

In a house not far from Davis Square in Somerville, MA, just outside of Boston, there's a garage full of equipment, a library full of books, and a group of people full of passion. They're called sprout. » Read more

3 Comments

Open access overview: Focusing on open access to peer-reviewed research articles and their preprints

This is an introduction to open access (OA) for those who are new to the concept. It doesn't cover every nuance or answer every objection, but it should cover enough territory to prevent the misunderstandings that delayed progress in our early days. » Read more

0 Comments