arduino

Arduinos, 3D printing, and more at Red Hat open hardware day

Opensource.com 3D printed coin

The Opensource.com team gathered in one of the large conference rooms at Red Hat tower in Raleigh on March 21 to make an open hardware day of it. » Read more

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Book of fun and easy electronics projects

Arduino open electronics

"When you go to a store and buy an electronic gizmo, does it ever occur to you that you could make one yourself? Or even that it would be FUN to make one yourself?" This is how John Baichtal's Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs begins, and that same curiosity and ingenuity flows through the entire book.

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Testing and tinkering with the Arduino Starter Pack

Arduino

Are you new to Arduino? Open hardware like the Arduino Starter Pack from Adafruit is a great way to start tinkering with this small computer board. It is the ideal kit for beginners to open hardware or anyone looking to start a project using the Arduino microcontroller.

To start, you need a computer from which you will write the code that will run in the Arduino board. This starter pack comes with an Arduino Uno board, which is likely the simplest. The typical programming cycle is to first write your code on the computer, then upload it to the Arduino board via a standard USB cable. The Arduino softwareis available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. » Read more

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pedalSHIELD designed using the open source tool KiCad

open source music

JR wrote to us to share his open hardware project: pedalSHIELD. It's a great example of open hardware + open source software + open instructions and tutorials.

Share your story with Opensource.com.



There are a good number of nice programmable DIY guitar pedals out there. So, the pedalSHIELD is nothing new, except for the fact that I think we've strived harder than the rest to keep the project open, simple, supported, and affordable. The idea was to design a platform for Arduino users to learn about digital signal processing, effects, and synthesizers—also to experiment without a deep knowledge in electronics or programming.

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TinyCircuits for big projects with small open hardware needs

tinycircuit for tracking your cata

Need a technology podcast to add to your queue? Check out Dave and Gunnar's show at dgshow.org.

Dave is the Chief Technologist for Red Hat's US Public Sector group and a self-described drum playing, motorcycle riding computer geek, husband, dad, and catechist.

Gunnar is the Chief Strategist for Red Hat's US Public Sector group whose ears perk up around discussions about cross-domain security, edge innovation, and interagency collaboration through the open source model. » Read more

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Like Arduino? Miniaturize your project with TinyCircuits

open source hardware

When you walk into the cavernous, old tire plant of Canal Place in Akron, Ohio, the last thing that you'd expect to find in this big building is such a "tiny" treasure. Unexpected though it may be, this is where Ken Burns and the TinyCircuits team has set up shop, and it's where they make tiny open source hardware treasures: miniaturized Arduino compatible circuits.

Ken Burns is the founder of TinyCircuits and has always been fascinated with computers. He first got access to a computer, an Apple 2, when he was six years old at a local library, for only 15 minutes a week. He continued working with computers, earned a degree in electrical engineering at the University of Akron, and eventually began working at AVID Technologies, Inc., a company that does product design in Twinsburg. » Read more

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How computer science teachers can better reach their students

open source learning

Mr. James Allen

Imagine being a high school freshman walking down the halls of your new school on the very first day. You somehow make it to first period without becoming epically lost in the unfamiliar halls. Finally, the bell rings, signaling that you've officially made it through your first high school class. Taking a look at your schedule, you see your next class is Exploring Computer Science. You think: "Wow, computers! This should be fun!"

For me, this idea and feeling of fun didn't end of that first day. It continued throughout the year as a student of Mr. Allen's Exploring Computer Science class.

I first met Mr. James Allen at an Akron Linux User Group meetup this past summer. He had learned that a future student of his (me) was presenting on Scratch and the Raspberry Pi and took the time to see my presentation (about an hour drive!). That's a dedicated teacher. That's Mr. Allen. » Read more

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Top 20 open source gifts for the holidays

The ultimate open source gift guide for 2013

Our 2013 open source holiday gift giveaway ended on December 11. Read the official rules for more details.

You could win some of the gifts from this guide, and the grand prize winner will receive a Lulzbot TAZ 2 3D printer! View the complete list of prizes.


We've searched the Internet and consulted with the open source geeks in our lives to identify some of 2013's coolest open source-related gifts for the holidays. We've found something for everyone's budget from big (a LulzBot TAZ 2 3D printer!) to small (who doesn't need a free download of Cards Against Humanity?), and everything in between.

So whether you're shopping for the open source enthusiast in your life or just for yourself, we hope you enjoy our The ultimate open source gift guide for 2013. Don't forget to enter our giveaway. » Read more

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Open source hardware holds the same promise as software

makey makey from SparkFun Electronics
All Things Open eBook

Download the free All Things Open interview series eBook

I see SparkFun Electronics mentioned often in my social media stream, so I jumped at the chance to interview Chris Clark, the company's Director of Information Technology.

From their website: SparkFun is an online retail store that sells the bits and pieces to make your electronics projects possible. Our ever-growing product catalog boasts over 3,500 components and widgets designed to help you unleash your inner inventor... Through our Department of Education, SparkFun offers classes and online tutorials designed to help educate individuals in the wonderful world of embedded electronics... We believe an open market is a healthy market and we open source all of our product designs. SparkFun subscribes to the belief that open source tech encourages innovation and creativity, while helping empower individuals to build the projects they want.

In this interview with Chris » Read more

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Arduino and the (tinker) light workshop

arduino electronics

Last month, Massimo Banzi, co-founder of the Arduino project, held a workshop at the Foundation Achille Castiglioni in Milan called: Arduino and the light.

Participants created an interactive lamp digitally manufactured and designed by Habits Studio. After an introduction about the potentiality of Arduino and to the fundamentals of interactivity, Massimo Banzi led participants through exercises to discover the basis of Arduino and some sensors. Then, over the weekend, everyone built their own lamp, making it interactive by using the components of TinkerKit!—a collection of different sensors and actuators to make prototyping much easier as you can directly hook them up to the Arduino.

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