wikimedia

Digitize any book in the public domain

open up

A form of poetry in India called Vachana sahitya is part of the popular Indian language, Kannada. It evolved in the 11th century and flourished in the 12th as part of the religious Lingayatha movement. Since that time, more than 259 Vachana writers, called Vachanakaru, have compiled over 11,000 Vachanas (verses).

21,000 of these verses were digitally published into 15 volumes, called Samagra Vachana Samputa, by the government of Karnataka. These volumes were then turned into a standalone project called Vachana Sanchaya; this project was taken on by two Kannada Wikimedians, a Kannada linguist, and the author O. L. Nagabhushana Swamy—to enrich the Kannada WikiSource. This team used Unicode, a standard of consistency for converting text (and code) into a new format. » Read more

1 Comment

Wikipedia Takes America photo event for your city

commons city photos

Have you visited the Wikipedia page for your hometown or the city you live in? There are likely images of local landmarks and interesting places, people, and things that are missing. To better represent your town or city, join the Wikipedia Takes America event this year! » Read more

0 Comments

Should you crowdsource your strategy?

Should you crowdsource your strategy?

All too often, direction setting happens in an ivory tower—cut off from valuable in-the-trenches insight and expertise and out of tune with shifts in the broader environment. What’s more, when strategy is cooked up in an elite enclave, the process of "selling" it to the very people expected to implement it becomes an arduous and uncertain chore. » Read more

1 Comment

Can an open, collaborative approach still work when not everyone has opted in?

Over the past two weeks, I've been reading the book Power and Love by Adam Kahane (thanks to Eugene Eric Kim for the recommendation). » Read more

3 Comments

Inventing the future is everybody's job

When Larry Huston faced the challenge of revving Procter & Gamble's innovation engine to contribute to $5 billion in annual topline growth, he opened up the ranks of the company's vaunted R&D operation to some 1.8 million scientists and researchers around the globe. » Read more

0 Comments

Telling the open source story - Part 2

Shortly after we published Telling the open source story - Part 1, Jelly Helm--the creator of the the Wikimedia Foundation videos discussed in that piece--came to speak to the People and Brand group at Red Hat. Jelly talked to us about how he approaches finding a brand narrative--the story that anyone, anywhere in the world can understand and connect with. And then we talked about the best ways to reveal those kinds of stories.

It was an interesting encounter and a few general themes emerged. » Read more

1 Comment