Google's Dataset Search, Julia programming language, and more news

Google's Dataset Search, Julia programming language, and more news

Catch up on the biggest open source headlines from the past two weeks.

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In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Google's new search engine, MIT's programming language Julia, AI inspired pizza recipes, and more.

Google announces a new search platform

Google made the news by announcing a new search engine, allowing you to search for datasets. This new platform's approach is based on the open standard schema.org. This open standard allows anyone who published data, to describe their datasets.

Researchers in the open data and science communities will clearly benefit from this platform. Google has also developed guidelines for dataset providers. You can read about this and find an example of a data search in Google's announcement.

Julia, the next big open source programming language?

TechRepublic described this programming language, originating from 2012 and just released as version 1.0, as follows: "designed to combine the speed of C with the usability of Python, the dynamism of Ruby, the mathematical prowess of MatLab, and the statistical chops of R."

Liked by data scientists and mathematicians, Julia is also used in industries, such as the automotive industry for self-driving cars, and for 3-D printing.

Julia is open source, counts 700 active contributors, 1,900 registered packages and two-million downloads. Details, download, and documentation can be found on julialang.org.

Open source announcements at GitHub Universe

Forbes writes about GitHub VP of worldwide sales, Paul St John, who has hinted on "major announcements related to open source" at its upcoming GitHub Universe conference.

Although St John does not go into details, he mentioned "taking a great leap forward, evolution-wise, about the role developers can play." The paragraph about companies approaching GitHub people and the search for developers might hint at some of these announcements. Will GitHub also become a "marketplace" for open source developers?

You can find the full interview with GitHub's Paul St John and Sam Hunt at the bottom of the Forbes article.

Using AI to cook up pizza recipes

Artificial Intelligence  is used in many areas, from forecasting aftershocks to its use in diagnostic radiology. At MIT they took it a step further. They trained a machine learning model on hundreds of “artisan pizza recipes from food blogs around the web." They even took the recipes to a pizza restaurant to bake them into reality.

The How To Generate (Almost) Anything project founded by these MIT graduate students and postdoctoral researchers pushed the boundaries of creativity inspired by AI.

In other news

Thanks, as always, to Opensource.com staff members and moderators for their help this week. Make sure to check out our event calendar, to see what's happening next week in open source.

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About the author

Robin Muilwijk - Robin Muilwijk is Open Source Manager at IOHK. He also serves as a community moderator for Opensource.com, an online publication by Red Hat, and as ambassador for The Open Organization. Robin is also Chair of the eZ Community Board, and Community Manager at eZ Systems. Robin writes and is active on social media to promote and advocate for open source in our businesses and lives.Follow him on Twitter @...