8 surprising things I learned about Python in 2021 | Opensource.com

8 surprising things I learned about Python in 2021

Opensource.com authors shed light on new ways to use the popular programming language.

Hands on a keyboard with a Python book
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WOCinTech Chat. Modified by Opensource.com. CC BY-SA 4.0
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Python has long been one of the most popular programming languages, but that doesn't mean there's nothing new to learn. This list of Opensource.com's most-read articles about Python is an excellent place to start. 

  • Widespread adoption of machine learning is here, and its applications are still growing. See how machine learning, using Naïve Bayes classifiers and implemented with Python, can solve real-life problems.

  • The transition to Python 3 is complete, but enhancements keep coming. Seth Kenlon highlights five hidden gems in Python 3 that stand out among recent improvements.

  • Openshot has been one of the best options for Linux video editing for years. This popular article will show you how you, too, can edit video on Linux with this Python app. 

  • The best part of Python is the limitless possibilities a programmer can achieve. Cython is a compiler that will not only help speed up code execution but also let users write C extensions for Python.

  • Python can make API unit testing simpler. Miguel Brito shows you three ways to test your API with Python.

  • As computation power increases, more and more programs run concurrently. That can make it challenging to debug, log, and profile what's going wrong. VizTracer was created to solve exactly that problem.

  • Users' personal projects, big and small, are a good reminder of how much fun open source coding can be. Here's an inspirational one: how Opensource.com author Darin London monitors his greenhouse using CircuitPython.

  • Linux users often encounter programs requiring a lot of command-line arguments that are not pleasant to work with. This is a nice configuration parsing hack to make life easier.

About the author

Sumantro Mukherjee - Hey, open source folks! I am Sumantro, hailing from India (the eastern part - former capital during the British era AKA Kolkata). I love sharing knowledge and writing about technology and experiences (mostly that I try every day). Anything from k8s, ansible to setting up TCMS for make-believe projects is right up my alley. I work as a Software Developer in Test in Fedora Project and contribute to Open Source communities in the form of testing, public speaking, documentation, mentorship, and...