education - Page number 5

How did the Outreach Program for Women work out for the Linux kernel this year?

free and open source opportunities for women

The Linux Foundation became a sponsor for the FOSS Outreach Program for Women earlier this year, choosing seven interns to hack on the Linux kernel from June through September. And, the results are in: the intern group ranked among the largest contributors to Linux kernel 3.12.

» Read more

5 Comments

Teaching with open source presentation service Reveal.js

teaching with open source

Opensource.com has a community moderator program, and I am proud to be a part of it. Recently we all met in person with the Opensource.com team in downtown Raleigh, NC at Red Hat Tower. One of our discussions centered around open source software for education, and Ruth Suehle, who leads Fedora's marketing team as well as writes for and advises Opensource.com, pointed out the wonders of Reveal.js, a new tool for preparing slide presentations.

"It's what the cool kids are using," she said. And, boy was she right!

A quick visit to the example presentations page is enough to persuade any skeptic. » Read more

4 Comments

Why children should learn to code, even if they don't have a future in IT

Teaching your children open source skills

By day, Red Hat product manager Burr Sutter works to make developers more successful and productive with open source tools, technologies, and techniques. So it's no surprise that he wants to ensure his own children know how to solve technical problems as well. So when summer vacation rolled around this year, Sutter encouraged his son to complete some courses on CodeAcademy and to sign up for a couple of iD Tech Camps.

In this interview, Sutter talks about why he wants his children to know how to fix the tech tools they use every day, how he balances that with other "kid" activities, and more. Parents who are looking for a way to get their children to learn code, to fix their computers, or just learn how online communities work may pick up some tips from Sutter's experiences. » Read more

0 Comments

University course trades textbook for Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi used at SUNY Albany

The Raspberry Pi has replaced the textbook at the State University of New York at Albany in the class, Information in the 21st Century.

Ethan Sprissler is the instructor for the 900 student class (split into two sections, 400 and 500 students respectively). He uses the Raspberry Pi instead of the traditional textbook in order to: » Read more

17 Comments

Hacking on health: open source for the rare disease community

open source health

Rare diseases are defined as as those afflicting populations of fewer than 200,000 patients, or about 1 in 1,500 people. There are about 7,000 rare diseases, the majority of which are genetically related and commonly affecting the very young (infants). At first glance, rare diseases seem to only affect a small number of people, but in reality their aggregate impacts close to 30 million patients in the US, and about 25 million in the EU alone. This impact also extends to the millions of caregivers and families, who also feel and live with the disease, just in a different way.

» Read more

2 Comments

Teach kids about copyright: a list of resources from Creative Commons

Lessons in copyright

Open curriculum alternatives to MPAA’s new anti-piracy campaign for kids.

It has come to our attention that the Motion Picture Association of America, the Recording Industry Association of America, and top internet service providers are drafting curriculum to teach kids in California elementary schools that copying is wrong, or as the headline on Wired.com reads: "Downloading is Mean!" » Read more

6 Comments

A professor learns how to change his methods to open source

open source teaching and learning

At the age of 77, I have published my first eBook and have a MOOC. These were not endeavors I ever intended to undertake.

I wanted to write Forms for a Future—a book about the civic discussions we need to have to have a future worthy of living. So, in the fall of 2007, after a 15 year absence from the world of education, I negotiated an adjunct position in the Honors College, figuring a small undergraduate class would help focus my attention. The course met three times a week and had three required full length textbooks.

» Read more

0 Comments

Envy Labs developer Carlos Souza talks about Code School and playing in a band

work and play
All Things Open eBook

Download the free All Things Open interview series eBook

I first heard of Carlos "Caike" Souza about a year ago while interviewing another developer for my bi-weekly podcast. My guest and I were discussing the things and people who inspired him and helped pave the way for his career. Carlos came up several times during that conversation.

Carlos Souza is a developer for Envy Labs, the company behind Rails for Zombies, Code School, and TryRuby.org.

I recently got an opportunity to speak with him, and it didn't take long for me to understand why he is referred by others as a source of inspiration. For me, talking with Carlos was the equivalent of riding the tallest roller coaster for the first time! He is genuinely dedicated to his career and projects, and his passion shows through when he talks about his experiences and future plans. His positive attitude and enthusiasm for everything, from coding best practices to his Small Acts Manifesto to music, is infectious. Check out his blog!

Read more in my interview with Carlos Souza here. » Read more

0 Comments

Back to school with open source: Five tools for less stress and better learning

open source resources for school

For parents: Shopping for back-to-school supplies, textbooks, clothing, and other accouterments can be frustrating and expensive. To help take the sting out of this ritual, students and parents might consider turning to free, open source software and tools in preparation for a new year of study. 

For students: Beyond cost savings, open source software empowers students to take ownership of their work and be free of software licensing treadmills. And, perhaps the ultimate educational opportunity is the ability to examine, analyze, and contribute to open source software and tools like these.

For teachers: Turning theory to practice, students can learn by doing as they help with documentation, quality testing, bug review, or even code contributions. Teaching is not simply the delivery of content, via lecture-taxi, to passive minds. Participation and collaboration ignites powerful learning, and empowers students to engage in thoughtful, meaningful scholarship. And open source can be the catalyst.

Here are five great open source applications for learning. Share this list to your favorite student or teacher!

9 Comments

Open.Michigan Translation Project: case study on health education for Uganda

translating open health materials

Back in January, we launched our translation pilot for Open.Michigan, focusing on two video series for health education. We are thrilled to report that the translation activities are still going strong—57 volunteers to date, 53 videos that include 128 completed translations covering 11 languages, and expansion into our family medicine video series. We are amazed at the skill and dedication of our volunteer translators.

» Read more

1 Comment