Open source news roundup for October 3 - 9, 2015

Real-Time Linux, 3D printed bicycle, Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages, and more

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In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at an open source 3D printed bicycle, the Real-Time Linux collaborative project, Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages project, and more.

Open source news roundup for October 3 - 9, 2015

3D print yourself a bicycle

Soon you will be able to 3D print your own bicycle! And, at the cost of roughly US $450. All thanks to two Dutch industrial designers, Stef de Groot and Paul De Medeiros, who started The Bike Project.

The bicycle design is modular, where every part can easily be removed and replaced. Stef and Paul encourage people to customize, 3D print, and build their own version. Read the full story on 3ders.org.

Real-Time Linux collaborative project

At LinuxCon Europe this week, the Linux Foundation announced the new Real-Time Linux (RTL) collaborative project. This project "brings together industry leaders and experts to advance and maximize technologies for the robotics, telecom, manufacturing, aviation and medical industries, among others."

Work on Real-Time Linux has been critical in advancing complex real-time computing systems. With the support from the industry, they can sustain this work. “By coming together to advance Real-Time Linux as a community, products and systems will be supported by the best developers in the world for years to come,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. More information is available on the Linux Foundation project page.

StoryWeaver book publishing platform

On International Literacy Day (September 8), Indian's children's book publisher Pratham Books launched a new online platform to publish books, StoryWeaver. India has roughly 200 million children, so the hope is to reach more of them with an online tool like this. What's special about StoryWeaver is that it allows the user to contribute to existing stories, in a textual and/or illustrative way, as well as to publish your own book. All the content on StoryWeaver is also openly licensed under Creative Commons. Read the full story on scroll.in.

Google introduces Accelerated Mobile Pages

Google has launched a project to introduce a new open source HTML standard. The Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) "project is an open source initiative that embodies the vision that publishers can create mobile optimized content once and have it load instantly everywhere." Read the full story on the official Google Blog. Or, check out the publishers, who already joined the project, on the official project site. The initial technical specification has also been released on GitHub.

A World without Linux video series debuts

As the Linux kernel celebrates its 24th birthday, Linux.com is debuts a new video series: A World Without Linux. They invite people to compete for prizes by finding the Linux-themed clues, or Easter eggs, held within each episode.

New toolkit promoting open source licensing

Cat Johnson writes for Shareable about a new toolkit by Creative Commons to promote open licensing of publicly funded resources. "With open licensing, resources that are created with public dollars are available to citizens to use and build upon." The toolkit is available and open to anyone to modify and improve.

Ubuntu to power the IoT of smart toys

During IoTWorld Europe, Canonical launched a new initiative call The Internet of Toys. Canonical is pushing things even further with this open source initiative, bringing Ubuntu Snappy Core to a new market: smart toys.

HP unveils open source network operating system

At LinuxCon Europe, HP announced its own Linux OS, aimed for open source network switches. "OpenSwitch has been created to allow network engineers to "innovate without restrictions" and create purpose-built networks quickly and easily." Find more information at openswitch.net, or read the full story on the Inquirer.

In other news

Thanks, as always, to Opensource.com staff members and moderators for their help this week. Make sure to check out our event calendar, to see what's happening next week in open source.