Introducing the Open Decision Framework

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For the past few years at Red Hat, we've been grappling with the challenges of growing an open organization and sustaining our culture along the way. One tool we've been developing and testing is the Open Decision Framework, a collection of best practices for applying open source principles to business projects and decisions.

Today, we're publishing community version 1.0 of the Open Decision Framework under a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. All the files are available on GitHub.

Download or fork a copy of the Open Decision Framework

Take a look, and let us know what you think in the comments below. Feel free to remix it, and share it with project managers, team leaders, and decision-makers in your organization!

Rebecca Fernandez is a Principal Program Manager at Red Hat, leading projects to help the company scale its open culture. She's an Open Organization Ambassador, contributed to The Open Organization book, and maintains the Open Decision Framework. She is interested in the intersection of open source principles and practices, and how they can transform organizations for the better.

7 Comments

So excited that this is now available to the community! Working through the Open Decision Framework as a leader has taught me how to fully think through the impact of each decision. And the suggestions it gives to participants in the process (to make positive assumptions, assume competence, and assume you're missing information) have helped me to more effectively communicate with the people making large-scale decisions, especially when I disagree.

You know, I hate to be That Guy -- but putting an odp file up on Github kinda misses the point of Github. You know I love y'all though.

This is really great (and in the true spirit of 'open')! Just noticed that the name "Red Hat" appears in the document. Is that correct, or is it something to be removed?

Hi Sacha,
Thanks for the feedback. :) We opted to release the framework as close to our internal Red Hat version as possible, and leave it up to anyone who remixes or forks it to make their own changes, including replacing our name with theirs or adding their own cultural nuances to the steps. Hope that helps!

In reply to by Sacha Telgenhof

Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International License.