Top 5 articles for the week of November 17, 2017

Top 5: Fortran turns 60, AutoCAD alternatives, and more

Take a look back at the week's top articles.

Top 5 articles for the week of November 17, 2017
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This week, we look at Fortran at 60, open source CAD programs, programming-friendly fonts, and more.

Top 5 posts

5. 5 open source fonts ideal for programming

Andrew Lekashman, the business head of Input Club, writes that, "When writing code, your font requirements are typically more functional in nature. This is why most programmers prefer to use monospace fonts with with fixed width letters when given the option."

4. 3 open source alternatives to ArcGIS Desktop

Opensource.com editor Jason Baker details how you can interact with geospatial data and create great looking maps with open source tools. Jason provides an overview of open source tools GRASS, QGIS, and uDig. Are you a spatial data nerd like Jason? Share your own favorite open source tools in the comments.

3. Getting started with OpenProject

Birthe Lindenthal is the chairperson of OpenProject Foundation, which governs and gives guidance to OpenProject, a web based project management software. The article provides a step-by-step guide for installing OpenProject from a Docker image and getting started creating a project, adding members, and creating work packages and a plan.

2. 3 open source alternatives to AutoCAD

Opensource.com editor Jason Baker wants to know if you've ever used an open source CAD tool. While these tools may lack some of the functionality of proprietary tools, they may provide everything you need to start designing. In the article you will learn about BRL-CAD, FreeCAD, LibreCAD, and some other open source options. If we have omitted an application you like, be sure to let us know in the comments.

1. Happy 60th birthday, Fortran

Community moderator Ben Cotton recaps fascinating history of the Fortran computer language, which began in 1957 and is still maintained to this day. Although Fortran may not have the same popular appeal as newer languages, those languages owe much to the pioneering work of the Fortran development team. Be sure to share your own experiences with Fortran in the comments.

About the author

Don Watkins - Educator, education technology specialist,  entrepreneur, open source advocate. M.A. in Educational Psychology, MSED in Educational Leadership, Linux system administrator, CCNA, virtualization using Virtual Box. Follow me at @Don_Watkins .