open business - Page number 3

Show me my cookies and no one gets hurt.

It’s 2011. Everything we do, say, like, and click on is tracked and known to the higher gods of the inter-webs. At least that’s what my co-workers Ruth Suehle and Bascha Harris always remind me. And I get it. I do. But when I log into Facebook or my GMail account and see ads served up to me that reference current conversations with friends or target my recent searches on Amazon, I still get weirded out. Why is that? » Read more

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Recap: Free vs Paid Business Models with Nicolas Pujol and Toni Schneider

Nicolas Pujol and Toni Schneider are experts on navigating free and open business models. Pujol, author of The Mindshare Market, helped MySQL grow from a $10m startup to a $1B acquisition, making it the second largest open source company at the time. » Read more

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Open leadership, on demand

Every time there's an Open Your World Forum webcast, I mark my calendar. And every time, something comes up, and I miss the webcast. Fortunately for the absent-minded among us, you can get the webcasts on demand.

(Here's where I should also admit to having a short attention span--and loving the option to fast-forward!)

So this morning, I pulled up the Charlene Li webcast, Open Leadership. » Read more

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A generational look at open management

Whether you're a newly appointed manager or a weathered veteran, one thing's for certain: when it comes to leading the workforce of the future, the times they are a-changin'. The ability (and willingness) to understand and adapt to the new paradigms of working will separate the good managers from the great managers, and both from the clueless ones. » Read more

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ON DEMAND: Open Leadership webcast with Charlene Li

Listen to our discussion with Charlene Li, author of New York Times best seller Open Leadership, for the latest in our Open Your World webcast series. » Read more

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What is your management model?

One enduring change in the management lexicon brought about by the dotcom revolution was the term business model—how a firm makes money. The concept had been in existence for decades, but the competition between "old" and "new" economy firms, with very different business models, helped to demonstrate its importance as a way of thinking about the basic choices firms make when it comes to their sources of revenue, their cost structure, and their make-or-buy options.

In the post-dotcom era, firms have continued to experiment with new business models, with some success. But genuinely new business models are hard to come by, and they aren’t as easily defended as they once were. Firms are therefore on the lookout for new forms of competitive advantage—they are looking for sources of distinctiveness that are enduring and hard to copy.

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Open Your World webcast with Bill Taylor, co-founder of Fast Company

A Game Plan for Game Changers: Practically Radical webcast with Bill Taylor and Polly LaBarre » Read more

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Open business funding: New ideas for a new economy

Starting a business is always a bit of a gamble. But investing in a start-up is practically a guessing game.

“A lot of venture capitalists will tell you that for early stage investment they don't have any real way of knowing which businesses will succeed,” said Marc Dangeard, head of Entrepreneur Commons. “They might invest in thirty businesses of the same type for the one that will thrive.”

Faced with the difficulties of venture capitalism and start-up funding, Dangeard decided it was time to “take the ego out” of venture capital. » Read more

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Can open business practices survive an acquisition?

It ain’t easy being open in today’s corporate environment. It’s even harder for an open company to stick to its knitting when it joins forces with a much larger, much more entrenched player in its industry. Is it possible for a small company to stay true to its more 21st century values if it hopes to reach the heights of its 20th century predecessors? » Read more

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Improving product quality the open source way

If we look at the differences between closed and open source software development processes, we can identify aspects that can be generalized and applied to other industries and domains.

Open source development—that combination of transparency, iterative development with early-and-often releases, and open participation—leads to higher quality products. When we're talking about software, people tend to think of quality in terms of bugs. But this is only part of the story of open development. » Read more

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