Help us write the next volume of the Open Organization book series

Help us write the next IT culture book

Find out how you can contribute to the next volume in the Open Organization series.

Help us write the next IT culture book
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If open organizations should be flexible, inclusive, collaborative, and communal, then so should the books we write about them.

So as the open organization community at Opensource.com prepares its next volume in the Open Organization book series, it's working the open source way.

This addition to the series will be chock full of writing at the intersection of organizational culture, open organizational models, and the agility-focused management paradigms becoming more popular in IT shops around the world. It'll put open-minded practitioners in conversation with devotees of scrum, continuous integration, DevOps, and kanban. It'll demonstrate the value of a culture-first approach to creating innovative teams.

And it may very well be the first book developed according to the Open Decision Framework.

That means it's open and ready for your suggestions, additions, and revisions. Just peruse the project on GitHub or join our community mailing list to participate.

You can contribute to this project by:

  • Reviewing the book's table of contents and pitching a contribution
  • Pointing potential authors to this project
  • Addressing an outstanding issue we've flagged
  • Reviewing page proofs in this repository and recording errors
  • Reviewing page proofs in this repository and developing end-of-chapter discussion questions and summary statements
  • Suggesting a title for the book

We're pushing updates regularly as the book takes shape. Our community hopes you'll join us as we re-imagine the future of IT—in the open, of course.

About the author

Bryan Behrenshausen
Bryan Behrenshausen - Bryan has been a member of the Opensource.com team since 2011. He currently edits the site's Open Organization section. In 2015, he earned his PhD in Communication from UNC, Chapel Hill. When he's not thinking or writing about all things open source, he's playing vintage Nintendo, reading classic science fiction, or rehabilitating an old ThinkPad. Around the Net, he goes by the nickname "semioticrobotic."