Download the new Python pip cheat sheet | Opensource.com

Download the new Python pip cheat sheet

Master the pip packaging tool with this handy cheat sheet.

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The pip packaging tool is used to interact with third-party Python packages. Its most frequent use is for installing packages in a virtual environment. pip can use many sources to find packages, and it has many ways to specify which packages should be installed.

In addition to installing packages, pip can also be used to build wheels. Wheels are a special file format that is optimized to install without any processing. This makes wheels useful for installing the same distribution in many different environments, e.g., on different machines or in different virtual environments in a single machine.

pip can also record the packages installed in a virtual environment in a text file, which can be transferred to reproduce the identical virtual environment. The text file can be emailed, sent over a chat service, or, most commonly, checked into version control.

Download the pip cheat sheet.

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About the author

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Moshe Zadka - Moshe has been involved in the Linux community since 1998, helping in Linux "installation parties". He has been programming Python since 1999, and has contributed to the core Python interpreter. Moshe has been a DevOps/SRE since before those terms existed, caring deeply about software reliability, build reproducibility and other such things. He has worked in companies as small as three people and as big as tens of thousands -- usually some place around where software meets system administration...