January top 10: Why data scientists love Kubernetes, CNC milling, Linux kernel, Vim plugins, and more

January top 10: Why data scientists love Kubernetes, CNC milling, Linux kernel, Vim plugins, and more

We round up our most popular reads from the past month.

Penguins walking on the beach
Image credits : 

Original photo by Rikki Endsley. CC BY-SA 4.0

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Opensource.com brought in 1,163,531 unique visitors who generated 1,810,561 page views in January, a new record for both metrics. This represents an almost 15% increase in page views over our previous record set in October 2018.

We published 106 articles last month, and welcomed 24 new writers. 

Our 2019 linux.conf.au series was a big hit with readers:

If you are interested in becoming a monthly contributor or would like to be considered for a Community Moderator role, contact the Opensource.com team. Not sure whether you're a good fit? Let us know and we'll answer your questions and help mentor you!

January top 10

metrics and data shown on a computer screen

Kubernetes' features that streamline the software development workflow also support the data science workflow.
Raspberries with pi symbol overlay

PriTunl is a VPN solution for small businesses and individuals who want private access to their network.
Tux with binary code background

Create your favorite designs with a DIY CNC milling machine based on open source software and an Arduino controller.
Penguins with space and stars overlay

How the quest to prevent time from running out led to all corners of the Linux kernel.
Person standing in front of a giant computer screen with numbers, data

Keep key information in view with WTF, the sixth in our series on open source tools that will make you more productive in 2019.

Answer our annual poll to let us know what your favorite Linux distribution is this year.
old school calculator

Keep track of where your money is going with HomeBank, the eighth in our series on open source tools that will make you more productive in 2019.
web development and design, desktop and browser

Expand Vim's capabilities and improve your workflow with these five plugins for writing code.
Hands programming

Learn how open source tools can help you be more productive in 2019. First up, Joplin.
Tux with binary code background

Doing Linux kernel and firmware development leads to lots of reboots and lots of wasted time.

About the author

Rikki Endsley - Rikki Endsley is the Developer Program managing editor at Red Hat, and a former community architect and editor for Opensource.com. In the past, she worked as the community evangelist on the Open Source and Standards (OSAS) team at Red Hat; a freelance tech journalist; community manager for the USENIX Association; associate publisher of Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN, and Ubuntu User; and as the managing editor of Sys Admin magazine and...